Timely and Effective Heart Attack Care

An acute myocardial infarction (AMI) - or heart attack - happens when one of the heart's arteries becomes blocked and the supply of blood and oxygen to part of the heart muscle is slowed or stopped.  When the heart muscle doesn't get the oxygen and nutrients it needs, the affected heart tissue may die.  These measurements show some of the recommended treatments provided, if appropriate, for most adults who have had a heart attack.

Data shown below for RMH is from the most recent update of CMS Hospital Compare / Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services.

 Measure 

RMH Performance 

Illinois Av. 

U.S. Av. 

Notes 

Average number of minutes before outpatients with chest pain or possible heart attack who need
specialized care were transferred to another hospital.  (A lower number of minutes is better.)

 Not avail.   

59 min.

58 min.

 Too few cases.

Average number of minutes before outpatients with chest pain or possible heart attack got an ECG. (A lower number of minutes is better.)

6 min.

6 min. 

7 min. 

 
Outpatients with chest pain or possible heart attack who got drugs to break up blood clots within 30 minutes of arrival (Higher percentages are better.)

Not avail.

 65%

 65%

Too few cases.

Outpatients with chest pain or possible heart attack who got aspirin within 24 hours of arrival.  (Higher percentages are better.)

96%

96% 

97% 

 
Heart attack patients who got drugs to break up blood clots within 30 minutes of arrival (Higher percentages are better.)

Not avail.

50% 

60% 

 No cases met criteria.

Heart attack patients given PCI within 90 minutes of arrival. (Higher percentages are better.)

   Not avail.    

97% 

96% 

 No cases met criteria.

Heart attack patients given aspirin at discharge. (Higher percentages are better.)

Not avail. 

99% 

99% 

 Too few cases.

Heart attack patients given a prescription for a statin at discharge. (Higher percentages are better.)

Not avail. 

99% 

99% 

 Too few cases.